vegetable gardening

Container Fruit Tree Gardening for Beginners

Choosing the correct plants for the area available, area of country the tree will be grown, and how many trees a person is interesting in tending; all of these factors contribute to making a wise choice for a tree which will bear the most fruit and live the longest.

To determine if container fruit tree gardening is suitable for the available area of a home or apartment, the person should decide how much space they want to dedicate to their “miniature orchard”.

An average dwarf plant requires a pot 18-24 inches in diameter and an equal amount in depth; a half barrel size is a good rule of thumb. If the area of the country has hard winters wheels would be wise to install in the bottom to make bringing the tree in and out of the cold would be wise.

A New Plant

When purchasing a new plant and pot it is important to make drain holes (if they aren’t already present) of about one inch, container fruit tree gardening requires the tree to be well watered and have thorough drainage. The new plant may come already potted or bare rooted; the term bare rooted means just what it sounds like, the roots of the plant are packed in paper rater than soil.

After purchasing a new fruit tree for container gardening it is important to thoroughly soaking the roots in fresh water for about twenty-four hours before planting. From this point it is a good idea to ready the pot, put some mixed soil in the pot mounding a bit extra in the middle of the pot to receive the freshly soaked roots of the tree.

The roots of the fruit tree should then be packed in soil; a small stake should be placed into the ground to help support the new addition to the fruit tree container garden until its roots take hold.

A good rule of thumb for fruit tree container gardening soil, purchase a good quality potting soil and add some perlite; a good ratio is four parts potting soil to one part perlite. Perlite is a volcanic material which holds moisture and nutrients to the soil in addition to allowing oxygen to circulate into the soil around the roots.

Choosing A Fruit Tree

Choosing a fruit tree for container gardening keeping ones climate in mind is essential; a person living in Maine shouldn’t hope to grow lemons without a greenhouse or people in Arizona to have an easy time with blueberries. Most berries, citrus and tropical fruit plants will grow well in pots; as will dwarf varieties of fruit trees such as peaches, pears, and plums grow well in containers.

Some fruit trees require pollination; for these trees multiple trees should be planted to provide adequate pollination for fruit tree container gardens. Some fruits such as cherries are self pollinating can be independent plants.


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Gardening Tip #14

When gardening, many people will opt for decorative grasses or shrubs. Monkey grass is an all time favorite, especially for a sidewalk. These will gardening plants can be for looks, can act as a border or fence, and can be used for privacy. Shrubs are easy to take care of and add a defining look to any yard or garden.